"When they allow a talk show host to play them like a two-dollar banjo, they demonstrate what kind of backbone they'll bring to the job later on, if we elect them. After they get elected will they continue to allow Jeff Crank to put a nickel in them and wind them up every Saturday morning?"

Barry Noreen, former columnist, Colorado Springs Gazette

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

THE FOURTEEN ANARCHISTS


By

Robert F. Harkins

Anarchy: A state of disorder due to absence or nonrecognition of authority. [i]

When this nation, or any nation, repudiates the rule of law it begins its decline to ruin. In 1789, the French people, made a Revolution, published a Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, nullified it, descended into anarchy; and indulged in the slaughter of thousands of French citizens, King Louis and his Queen Marie. In the end the French were swallowed whole by a Jacobin Napoleon who would crown himself emperor and destroy European democracy wherever it was urged.

Anarchy, Philosopher A.C. Grayling writes,

Literally means ‘without ruler or government’, and denotes a political arrangement in which there is no framework of laws or a governing authority. Anarchism is the theory that advocates anarchy in this sense; it is the theory held by those who argue for abolition of the state, defined as a body, which exists to maintain a compulsory legal order.

Anarchy is a psychosis that fills the intellectual vacuum of a mind given to pretensions of utopia; Anarchy is lawlessness served hard and straight up. A.C. Grayling writes,

… an anarchic arrangement would be likely to work as follows. Contemporary advanced societies function fairly smoothly, in general, within a framework of institutions which give assurance to most people that they can rely on arrangements they have made, contracts they have entered into, and services they depend on.

This fact is overlooked by most people because of the very success of its operation; yet it is the result of its being constituted by the enforceable rule of law and well-regulated normal government—in short the opposite of anarchy, either in the colloquial sense of disorder or in the strict sense of absence of government… As this suggests, the anarchists’ belief that people can live in unregulated mutual harmony is touchingly na├»ve. [ii]

Anarchy is a pseudo-moral claim to lawlessness, to a status above the law, all others and all else. For example, the first obligation of national government is to maintain the security of its borders. As the American government, Republican and Democrat, continues to ignore this obligation, immigrants unlawfully entering the United States, now claim simply by virtue of their illegal entry, the birthright of American citizenship and a moral right to the largess of its massive welfare state.

Those who claim American citizenship simply because they want it, and the government that encourages their anarchist presumption, have declared themselves proof against all lawful constraints. A lawful basis upon which to grant the benefice of American citizenship to illegal immigrants does not exist. Therefore, that which the government cannot justify by law it ignores or justifies by vacuous and insipid sentiment. City politicians, San Francisco, for example have declared their city a sanctuary for illegal immigrants. In doing so, they have declared themselves beyond the reach of the American Constitution.

A media and a leftist presidential administration are now praising union activists in Wisconsin for a civil disobedience they intimate is centered in justice and raised in the tradition of a Thoreau, Mahatma Gandhi or Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.. The Wisconsin protests, however, do not rise to the dignity of civil disobedience. On the contrary, a public union and its confederates have placed themselves above the law. Their conduct does not merit praise; it cries out for condemnation.

Perhaps tens of thousands of teachers (and other union activists) in state and out of state, teachers who are being paid by taxpayers to teach their children, have called in sick—though they are not sick— so that that may use the time paid for by the taxpayer to stop a vote that would cut costs and abolish collective bargaining. Medical doctors, complicit in the lie, are writing medical excuses for those hale and hearty teachers who as they seek the paralysis of Republican government have repudiated their obligation to work for their pay.

The Fourteen Anarchists, Democrat state senators, in a calculated attempt to throw a monkey wrench into the machinery of democracy have fled the state to sojourn at a resort in Illinois. They should be impeached. These Fourteen Anarchists are being paid by Wisconsin taxpayers. They have taken an oath to faithfully perform the Constitutional duties of their office. However, in an effort to seek financial and political gain for their union constituency—a constituency comprising only a fraction of those Wisconsin citizens who voted last November—they have willfully prevented the operation of a democratically elected legislature.

The Fourteen Anarchists have violated their solemn oath. They have abrogated democracy. They have shown their contempt for the will of a sovereign people. Their self-serving expressions of sentiment, to the effect that they are “standing with the people” is the stuff of soapbox rhetoric. In fact, they have betrayed the democratically elected majority just as they have surrendered their state constitution to anarchy and their sworn duty to the illegitimate demands of union lawbreakers.

To these continuing acts of lawlessness, the President of the United States and the Democratic National Committee have lent their strategic and moral support.

The stakes are high. Should Republicans surrender under fire to the demands of union activists, including The Fourteen Anarchists, they will have set the precedent that anarchy trumps democracy. Anarchy, however, as it does not work will not trump democracy. Anarchy is the first symptom of national decline. Anarchy will not itself endure, nor will it usher in an era of workers’ justice. Anarchy is always a prelude to something else. When confronted with anarchy, Americans should ask, what comes next? For the nation that succumbs to anarchy may well find itself swallowed whole by its own Napoleon.

[i] Oxford Dictionary.

[ii] A.C. Grayling, Ideas That Matter, The Concepts That Shape the 21st Century, An Opinionated Guide.

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